Fall 2022: Phl 820 – Topics in Continental Philosophy: Materialist Societal Epistemology

General information

Instructor

Here is more information about Prof. Lotz

Class Meetings

Days: Monday
Time: 5:30-8:30pm
Place: SK 530

Office & Office Hours

Phone: 517.355.4490 [dept.])
Place: SK 503
Hours: Mondays, 3:30-5pm

Other Contact

E-mail: lotz@msu.edu
Home Phone: please ask
Webpage: http://christianlotz.info

Box

You will find my box in the front office of the philosophy department (SK 503)

Schedule

Block I: (Theory of) Society: Marx, Sohn-Rethel, Adorno

Sep 5, Labor Day
No class, read some Marx!

Sep 12, Marx I: Society

Lukacs, What is Orthodox Marxism? (D2L)
Marx, Introduction, Grundrisse (D2L)
Adorno, Society (D2L)

Helpful
Hall, A Reading of the 1857 Introduction (D2L)

Sep 19, Marx II: Ideology

Marx, German Ideology, excerpts (D2L)
Marx, Feuerbach Theses (D2L)
Marx, Philosophical and Economic Manuscripts (D2L)

Voluntary:
Habermas, Knowledge and Human Interest, part 1 (D2L)

Helpful
Zizek, The Spectre of Ideology (in Mapping Ideology)

Note: the manuscripts of the German Ideology recently have been republished in a new order in the German Collected Works (MEGA). In English: check Carver, T. and Blank, D., Marx and Engels’ ‘German Ideology’ Manuscripts (Palgrave)

Protocol 1: Matt

Sep 26, Marx III: Commodity Fetishism

Marx, Capital, Vol.1, ch.1.4

Helpful:
Zizek, How did Marx invent the symptom? (D2L), in: Mapping Ideology

Protocol 2: Reese

Oct 3, Sohn-Rethel: Social Synthesis, Exchange Principle

Sohn-Rethel, Intellectual and Manual Labor, part 1 & 2 (book)
Adorno, Theodor W. “Theodor W. Adorno on ‘Marx and the Basic Concepts of Sociological Theory” (D2L)

Voluntary
Marx, Capital, Vol.1, chapter 2 (exchange)

Helpful
McNulty, Frankfurt School Critical Theory as Transcendental Philosophy: Alfred Sohn-Rethel’s Synthesis of Kant and Marx (D2L)
O’Kane, The Critique of Real Abstraction: From the Critical Theory of Society to the Critique of Political Economy and Back Again (D2L)

Protocol 3: Noah

Block II: Theory, Ideology, Praxis: Althusser

Oct 10, Althusser I

Althusser, Is it simple to be a Marxist in Philosophy? (D2L), in: Philosophy and the Spontaneous Philosophy of the Scientist
Althusser, On the Materialist Dialectic, in: For Marx (D2L), focus on 163-172, 182-218

Protocol 4: Carlos
Presentation 1: Peighton (On the Materialist Dialectic)

Oct 17, Althusser II

Althusser, Theory, Theoretical Practice and Theoretical Formation: Ideology and Ideological Structure (D2L), in: Philosophy and the Spontaneous Philosophy of the Scientist
Althusser, Philosophy and the Spontaneous Philosophy of the Scientist (D2L), in: Philosophy and the Spontaneous Philosophy of the Scientist

Helpful:
Balibar, From Bachelard to Althuser: the concept of ‘epistemological break’ (D2L)
Lewis, Knowledge versus ‘Knowledge’: From Althusser on the Autonomy of Science and Philosophy from Ideology (D2L)

Two excellent books on Althusser:
Elliott, Althusser. The Detour of Theory (Haymarket Books)
Montag, Althusser and His Contemporaries. Philosophy’s Perpetual War (Duke)

Protocol 5: Peighton
Presentation 2 (on Theory, Theoretical Practice): Reese

Oct 24, Break Day
No Class

Oct 31, Althusser III

Althusser, On the Reproduction of Capitalism, chapter 11&12&Notes&Appendixes (D2L)

Protocol 6: Reese
Presentation 3 (on ideology): Noah

Block III: After Althusser

Nov 7, Hall I

Hall, Culture, the Media, and the ‘Ideological Effect’ (D2L)
Hall, Racist Ideologies and the Media (D2L)
Hall, Rethinking the Base Superstructure Metaphor (D2L)
Hall, The Problem of Ideology: Marxism without Guarantees (D2L)

Protocol 7: Matt

Nov 14, Hall II

Hall, Cultural Studies 1983: A Theoretical History (book)

Protocol 8: Noah

Nov 21, Bourdieu I

Bourdieu, Critique of Theoretical Reason (part one of Logic of Practice) (D2L)
Bourdieu, Making the economic habitus (D2L)

Protocol 9: Peighton
Presentation 4: Carlos

Nov 28, Bourdieu II

Bourdieu, Bodily Knowledge (part 4 of Pascallian Meditations)
Bourdieu, Structures and Habitus (part 2 of Outline of a Theory of Practice)

Protocol 10: Carlos
Presentation 5 (on Bodily Knowledge): Matt

Block III: Contemporary Authors

Dec 5, Haslanger & Shelby & Mills

Haslanger, Critical Theory and Practice (D2L)
Haslanger, Ideology in Practice (D2L)
——-
Mills, Ideology and Social Cognition (D2L)
Mills, Ideology (Routledge handbook of epistemic injustice) (D2L)
Shelby, Ideology, Racism, and Critical Social Theory (D2L)
Shelby, Is Racism in the Hart? (D2L)

Perhaps
Stanley, “Ideology & “Political Ideologies,” (How Propaganda Works)
Gooding-Williams, “Jason Stanley’s Theory of Propaganda and Ideology” (D2L)

Dec 16, Final Paper
Final paper due via email by the end of Dec 16

Course Description

In this seminar we will read and discuss critical societal epistemology. We will look into the Marxist tradition, the British cultural studies tradition, French Structuralism and Situationists, as well as contemporary authors. Philosophers discussed come from the following list of authors: Marx, Althusser, Butler, Mannheim, Bourdieu, Foucault, Sohn-Rethel, Hall, Williams, Debord, Habermas, Haslanger, and Shelby. We will ask two questions: [1] how and what do we know about society (theory)? and [2], how and what does society know of itself (ideology)? Overall, we will try to figure out whether we can think of societal self-knowledge as something different than (collective) world-views, biases, or (mental) beliefs.

Course Goals

This course should make you familiar with the main approaches to understand social knowledge and ideology from a societal perspective.

Note

This graduate seminar is not based on a set of fixed knowledge and, as such, is not based on a behavioral idea of education; rather, we will try to learn together and critically examine the material. The material is the absolute center of this class. Free floating discussions about things unrelated to the material are to be avoided.

Recommended Texts to Have in your own Book Library

  • Althusser, Reproduction of Capitalism (Verso)
  • Sohn-Rethel, Manual and Intellectual Labor (Haymarket Books)
  • Althusser, Philosophy and the Spontaneous Philosophy of the Scientist (Verso)
  • Althusser, How to be a Marxist in Philosophy (Bloomsbury)
  • Marx, Capital (Penguin)
  • Marx, Grundrisse (Penguin)
  • Hall, Cultural Studies 1983 (Duke)
  • Lukacs, History and Class Consciousness

Recommended Secondary Literature

  • Lehmann, Ideology (Haymarket)

Important Journals

  • Historical Materialism
  • Capital&Class
  • Rethinking Marxism
  • Science&Society
  • Constellations
  • Philosophy&Social Critcism

Important Handbook and Dictionaries

  • SAGE Handbook of Frankfurt School Critical Theory (4vols)
  • SAGE Handbook of Marxism
  • Palgrave Handbook of Critical Theory
  • Historisch Kritisches Wörterbuch des Marxismus (Argument)
  • Marx Dictionary (ed. Angus)
  • Dictionary of Marxist Thought (ed. Bottomore)

Important Book Series

  • Critical Theory and the Critique of Society (Bloomsbury)
  • Historical Materialism (Brill/Haymarket)

Requirements

Course Requirements

  • 2 protocols, write-up, up to 900 words, take questions in class
  • 2 oral presentations, write-up, up to 900 words, 20-25 minutes, leading class discussion
  • Final paper, conference style, 3600-4500 words
  • Regular participation, you are expected to attend every week, except in cases of reasonable excuses

Protocol

The class protocol should cover our discussion in class. Protocols should have a length of 2-3 pages (no more than 900 words), and they will in and outside of the classroom force us to have an ongoing reflection on our texts that we study for class. They can also include problems or questions that the writers had either with our class discussion or with the texts itself, but above all protocols should cover what I lectured about and what we discussed afterwards. Protocols should clarify and discuss selected issues in question. Protocols have to be sent out to everyone by Sunday at noon. Everyone will read the protocols before class. Please avoid late turn ins. The student who wrote the protocol will address questions during the first 15-20 minutes of the next class meeting.

Presentation & Write-Up

Each student will be responsible for working out introductory presentations, which should function as a platform for our discussions. Please focus on selected aspects of the readings; desired length of presentations: around 20 minutes. Please distribute a brief write-up/overview of what you will be talking about by Sunday morning. Your write-up should have a length of 2-3 pages. A write-up differs from a handout (used during a presentation); i.e., the write-up should consists of a coherent text that either interprets, reflects on, or explains the primary material. Let’s call it a “miniature-paper” that everyone reads before class. Note: the reading material should be the absolute focus of your presentation. Free floating discussions that are completely unrelated to the readings are to be avoided by all means.

General Remark

Given that this is a graduate seminar, I expect self-motivation, autonomy, civility, as well as self-responsibility. My seminars are completely open: you can always bring in your own positions or criticize others. My job is to clarify thoughts. The attendance requires the willingness to intensively study the texts selected for class.

Final Paper

The class essay should be well researched and should present a substantial reflection on some parts of the material discussed in class. I expect excellent papers in regard to research, form, and content. The paper should be accompanied by an abstract of no more than 150 words. The paper should be “conference style,” i.e., it should have a length of around 15 pages and, ideally, could be presented at a conference.

DFs

I will refuse giving DFs in this class, unless you find yourself in an emergency situation (health issues, etc.)

Course Evaluation

Assignments (traditional)

2 protocols + class discussion25 points
2 oral presentations + write-up25 points
final paper50 points
——–
   100 points
 

Grading

4.0 (=A)100 – 93
3.592 – 87
3 (=B)86 – 82
2.581 – 77
2 (=C)76 – 72
1.571 – 65
1.0 (=D)64 – 60
0.0< 60

GENERIC SYLLABUS (might not be applicable to each class)

Laptop/Cell Phone/Tablet Policy

You are not permitted to use laptops or cell phones in class, unless needed for medical reasons. Flat devices, such as tablets, are permitted  if you have purchased the literature required for class electronically. Please do not text under the table. Cell phones should be removed from tables. Failure to follow this policy will lead to unannounced assignments in class or loss of points (at the digression of the instructor).

Class Attendance

As mentioned above, I do not employ in my classes a class attendance policy. Having said this, you should be aware that class attendance is very important. When engaging in a philosophical and humanistic dialogue it is necessary to be an active and present participant in the ongoing discussion. If you miss class please do not email me asking if you missed anything important. Every class is important. You should get a study buddy for the class; a student in class who will inform you of what you missed. If you miss a class you can come to my office hours or make an appointment to discuss the material, providing you have read the material and you simply want to see if your understanding of the material is on target. Time in office hours will not be used to repeat the class lectures.

Grading Criteria + Paper Writing Tips

Check out this page for grading criteria, example of assignments, etc.

Online Research Sources

Unfortunately, some people think that the internet as such is a reliable source of information. If you decide to use online sources for additional information or your paper then do not just use one of the common internet search engines, such as Google; rather, use reliable academic sources, such as Britannica Online, or the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. The Internet Ecyclopedia of Philosophy isn’t very good, but still acceptable. Check out MSU’s library resources! And, as with other sources, you must cite any online sources to which you refer in your essay.

Writing Center Information

MSU’s writing center offers excellent help on all matters regarding writing and learning. Check the website at http://writing.msu.edu for an overview and hours. For more information, please call 517.432.3610 or send an e-mail to writing@msu.edu.

Grief Absence Policy

I follow MSU’s general grief absence policy, which can be found here.

Integrity of Scholarship and Grades (Plagiarism)

The following statement of University policy addresses principles and procedures to be used in instances of academic dishonesty, violations of professional standards, and falsification of academic or admission records, herein after referred to as academic misconduct. [See General Student Regulation 1.00, Protection of Scholarship and Grades.]

Academic Honesty

Article 2.3.3 of the Academic Freedom Report states that “The student shares with the faculty the responsibility for maintaining the integrity of scholarship, grades, and professional standards.” In addition, the (insert name of unit offering course) adheres to the policies on academic honesty as specified in General Student Regulations 1.0, Protection of Scholarship and Grades; the all-University Policy on Integrity of Scholarship and Grades; and Ordinance 17.00, Examinations. (See Spartan Life: Student Handbook and Resource Guide and/or the MSU Web site: www.msu.edu) Therefore, unless authorized by your instructor, you are expected to complete all course assignments, including homework, lab work, quizzes, tests and exams, without assistance from any source. You are expected to develop original work for this course; therefore, you may not submit course work completed for another course to satisfy the requirements for this course. Students who violate MSU rules may receive a penalty grade, including but not limited to a failing grade on the assignment or in the course. Contact your instructor if you are unsure about the appropriateness of your course work. (See also https://www.msu.edu/~ombud/)

Plagiarism, from the Ombudsman’s page

Plagiarism (from the Latin plagiarius, an abductor, and plagiare, to steal) is defined by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy on Misconduct in Research (take that!) as “ . . . the appropriation of another person’s ideas, processes, results or words without giving appropriate credit.”

Accidental or Unintentional
One may not even know that they are plagiarizing.  It is the student’s responsibility to make certain that they understand the difference between quoting and paraphrasing, as well as the proper way to cite material.

Blatant
Here, students are well aware that they are plagiarizing.  Purposefully using someone else’s ideas or work without proper acknowledgment is plagiarism.  This includes turning in borrowed or bought research papers as one’s own.

Self
Turning in the same term paper (or substantially the same paper) for two courses without getting permission from one’s instructor is plagiarism.

The Spartan Code of Honor

Student leaders have recognized the challenging task of discouraging plagiarism from the academic community. The Associated Students of Michigan State University (ASMSU) is proud to be launching the Spartan Code of Honor academic pledge, focused on valuing academic integrity and honest work ethics at Michigan State University. The pledge reads as follows:

“As a Spartan, I will strive to uphold values of the highest ethical standard. I will practice honesty in my work, foster honesty in my peers, and take pride in knowing that honor is worth more than grades. I will carry these values beyond my time as a student at Michigan State University, continuing the endeavor to build personal integrity in all that I do.”

The Spartan Code of Honor academic pledge embodies the principles of integrity that every Spartan is required to uphold in their time as a student, and beyond. The academic pledge was crafted with inspiration of existing individual college honor codes, establishing an overarching statement for the entire university. It was formally adopted by ASMSU on March 3, 2016, endorsed by Academic Governance on March 22, 2016, and recognized by the Provost, President, and Board of Trustees on April 15, 2016.

SIRS Evaluations

Michigan State University takes seriously the opinion of students in the evaluation of the effectiveness of instruction and has implemented the Student Instructional Rating System (SIRS) to gather student feedback (https://sirsonline.msu.edu). This course utilizes the online SIRS system, and you will receive an e-mail during the last two weeks of class asking you to fill out the SIRS web form at your convenience. In addition, participation in the online SIRS system involves grade sequestration, which means that the final grade for this course will not be accessible on STUINFO during the week following the submission of grades for this course unless the SIRS online form has been completed. Alternatively, you have the option on the SIRS website to decline to participate in the evaluation of the course. We hope, however, that you will be willing to give us your frank and constructive feedback so that we may instruct students even better in the future. If you access the online SIRS website and complete the online SIRS form or decline to participate, you will receive the final grade in this course as usual once final grades are submitted.

Social Media and Sharing of Course Materials

As members of a learning community, students are expected to respect the intellectual property of course instructors. All course materials presented to students are the copyrighted property of the course instructor and are subject to the following conditions of use:

  • Students may record lectures or any other classroom activities and use the recordings only for their own course-related purposes.
  • Students may share the recordings with other students enrolled in the class. Sharing is limited to using the recordings only for their own course-related purposes.
  • Students may post the recordings or other course materials online or distribute them to anyone not enrolled in the class with the advance written permission of the course instructor and, if applicable, any students whose voice or image is included in the recordings.
  • Any student violating the conditions described above may face academic disciplinary sanctions.

Student Support Program (SSP)

Michigan State University is offering all MSU students access to counseling support 24/7/365 through My SSP: Student Support Program. My SSP is free to all MSU students. My SSP is confidential, and can help with:

  • Adapting to new challenges
  • Being successful at school
  • Relationships with friends and family
  • Practical issues with studying
  • Stress, sadness, loneliness, and more

The My SSP professional counselors are available to help anytime, anywhere with:

  • Immediate support by phone and chat
  • Ongoing support by appointment via phone and video
  • In addition, culturally relevant support is available in the language of the caller’s choice.

There are multiple options for connecting with a My SSP counselor:

  • Download the free My SSP app on Google Play or iTunes
  • Chat online at http://us.myissp.com
  • Call 1-866-743-7732
  • From outside North America, call 001.416.380.657

Accommodations for Students with Disabilities

Students with disabilities should contact the Resource Center for Persons with Disabilities to establish reasonable accommodations. For an appointment with a counselor, call 353-9642 (voice) or 355-1293 (TTY)

Drops and Adds

The last day to add this course is the end of the first week of classes. The last day to drop this course with a 100 percent refund and no grade reported is (see Academic Calendar). The last day to drop this course with no refund and no grade reported is (see Academic Calendar). You should immediately make a copy of your amended schedule to verify you have added or dropped this course.

Note on Attendance

Students who fail to attend the first four class sessions or class by the fifth day of the semester, whichever occurs first, may be dropped from the course.

Spring 2022: IAH 231a – Existential Problems of Human Life

Schiele, Seated Male Nude, 1910 (detail)

General information

Instructor

Here is more information about Prof. Lotz

Class Meetings

Days: M/W
Time: 12:40pm-2:30pm
Place: Berkey 207

Office

Hours: after class or via appointment
Phone: 517.355.4490 [dept.])
Office: 503 S. Kedzie Hall

Other Contact

E-mail: lotz@msu.edu
Home Phone: please ask
Webpage: http://christianlotz.info

Box

You will find my box in the front office of the philosophy department

Schedule

Introduction

Jan 10, Introduction

Section I: Human Existence and Anxiety

Jan 12, Courage and Non-Being
Tillich, The Courage to Be, Ch.1 (focus on the first two subsections)

Jan 17, MLK Day
No class

Jan 19, no class

Jan 24, Main Types of Anxiety
Tillich, The Courage to Be, Ch.2

Jan 26, Main Types of Anxiety
Tillich, The Courage to Be, Ch.2

Weekend Assignment 1 due (Jan 30, noon)

Jan 31, Being a Social Being
Tillich, The Courage to Be, Ch.4

Feb 2, no class (email sent on 2/1)

Weekend Assignment 2 due (Feb 6, noon)

Feb 7, Being an Individual
Tillich, The Courage to Be, Ch.5

Section II: A Psychological Look at Anxiety

Feb 9, Freud on Anxiety
Freud, Inhibitions, Symptoms, and Anxiety, sections I-VII (D2L)

Weekend Assignment 3 due (Feb 13, noon) [on sections VIII-X]

Feb 14, Freud on Anxiety
Freud, Inhibitions, Symptoms, and Anxiety, sections I-VII (D2L)

Feb 16, Freud on Anxiety
Freud, Inhibitions, Symptoms, and Anxiety, sections VIII-X (D2L)

Weekend Assignment 4 due (Feb 20, noon) [on Neumann]

Feb 21, Freud on Anxiety
Freud, Inhibitions, Symptoms, and Anxiety, sections XI/Addenda (D2L)

Feb 23, Anxiety and Politics
Neumann, Anxiety and Politics (D2L)

Section III: Existential Alienation

NO Weekend Assignment 5 due (CHANGED, new instructions via email on 3/1)

Feb 28, Everything is Superfluous
Sartre, Nausea, 1-94

Mar 2, no class (announced in email on Feb 28)
Sartre, Nausea, 94-178

Weekend Assignment 6 due (Mar 6, noon, CHANGED, new instructions via email on 3/1)

Mar 7, Break
No class

Mar 9, Break
No class

Mar 14, “I go out. Why? Well, because I have no reason not to”
Sartre, Nausea, 1-178

Mar 16, “I go out. Why? Well, because I have no reason not to”
Sartre, Nausea, 1-178

Section IV: Be!

Weekend Assignment 7 due (Mar 20, noon) [on Fromm!]

Mar 21, The Failure of our Modern Societies
Fromm, To Have or To Be?, Introduction + chapter 1-2

Mar 23, no class

Weekend Assignment 8 due (Mar 27, noon)

Mar 28, Having and Being
Fromm, To Have or To Be?, chapter 4+5

Mar 30, Having and Being
Fromm, To Have or To Be?, chapter 6+7

Apr 4, Having and Being
Fromm, To Have or To Be?, chapter 8+9

Section V: Think like a Stoic!

Apr 6, Happiness
Seneca, Dialogues and Essays, 85-112 [no class, assignment sent out and announced on D2L on 4/5]

Weekend Assignment 9 due (Apr 10, noon) [ON Finitude, 140-163]

Apr 11, Happiness
Seneca, Dialogues and Essays, 85-112

Apr 13, Finitude
Seneca, Dialogues and Essays, 140-163

Weekend Assignment 10 due (Apr 17, noon)

Apr 18, Anger
Seneca, Dialogues and Essays, 18-53

Apr 20, Wrap-Up
Last class

Apr 25, No class
No class

Apr 27, No class
No class

Final Take-Home Exam Due
Monday, May 02, 2022, 12:45 PM via D2L

Course Description

In this course we will examine and discuss selected aspects of what it means to be human, from a general philosophical, humanist, and social-psychological perspective, i.e., we will not address the issue from a scientific or biological point of view. Instead, the assumption is that the most central aspects of what it means to be human need to be discussed from a more general perspective. One of the assumptions of the course is that the experience of of anxiety in the context of what it means to live an “authentic life” are central “experiences” that define (modern) human experience. You should be aware that the main sources of this class come from philosophy, theology, and social psychology. Accordingly, expect a high level of intellectual engagement and maturity.

Twenty years after my own graduation, I have come gradually to understand that the liberal-arts cliché about “teaching you how to think” is actually shorthand for a much deeper, more serious idea: “Learning how to think” really means learning how to exercise some control over how and what you think. It means being conscious and aware enough to choose what you pay attention to and to choose how you construct meaning from experience. Because if you cannot exercise this kind of choice in adult life, you will be totally hosed. Think of the old cliché about “the mind being an excellent servant but a terrible master.” This, like many clichés, so lame and unexciting on the surface, actually expresses a great and terrible truth. It is not the least bit coincidental that adults who commit suicide with firearms almost always shoot themselves in the head. And the truth is that most of these suicides are actually dead long before they pull the trigger. And I submit that this is what the real, no-bull- value of your liberal-arts education is supposed to be about: How to keep from going through your comfortable, prosperous, respectable adult life dead, unconscious, a slave to your head and to your natural default-setting of being uniquely, completely, imperially alone, day in and day out. (David Foster Wallace, This is Water)

ZOOM/COVID-19 (added: 1/1/22)

  • This class will be taught – hopefully only for three weeks – via ZOOM in a classical fashion. I will talk about the readings and we will have discussions about the issues discussed in the texts.
  • The primary text will be the absolute focus of this class; we will read slowly passages together.
  • Our ZOOM sessions require you to be polite and attentive; as such, I do not want you to turn off your microphone, which, in turn, should make it easier for you to focus on the class session. Please make sure that you are in a quiet spot (at a desk or a table), and that you enter our meetings on time.
  • Please use a headset, which helps us create a more “intimate” atmosphere; headset microphones usually remove background noise; inexpensive headsets can easily be found online. If you can’t afford a headset (or don’t want to use one), then please try to use at least headphones or ear buds.
  • If multiple participants are speaking, and if they also use external speakers to hear the meeting audio, there can be an echo loop. Zoom uses echo cancellation to address this problem. However, headset/headphones/earbuds will eliminate this problem.
  • Please also do not turn off your camera (unless your internet connection is very slow), as this will also help everyone focus on our class session and eliminate distractions.
  • Please do not use your phone for ZOOM sessions.
  • Please do not use your phone for reading the material. This is a humanities class. It is simply impossible to study this kind of reading material via such a small screen. I recommend getting the readings selected for class on paper.
  • Set ZOOM to “gallery view” (instead of “speaker view”), as this makes it easier to see everyone in class (i.e., not only the speaker).

IAH Course Goals

The mission of Integrative Studies in the Arts and Humanities is to help students become more familiar with ways of knowing in the arts and humanities and to be more knowledgeable and capable in a range of intellectual and expressive abilities.  IAH courses encourage students to engage critically with their own society, history, and culture(s); they also encourage students to learn more about the history and culture of other societies.  They focus on key ideas and issues in human experience; encourage appreciation of the roles of knowledge and values in shaping and understanding human behavior; emphasize the responsibilities and opportunities of democratic citizenship; highlight the value of the creative arts of literature, theater, music, and arts; and alert us to important issues that occur among peoples in an increasingly interconnected, interdependent world. The goals of IAH courses are to assist students to

  • Cultivate habits of inquiry and develop investigative strategies from arts and humanities perspectives;
  • Explore social, cultural, and artistic expressions and contexts;\
  • Act as culturally aware and ethically responsible citizens in local and global communities.
  • Critically assess, produce, and communicate knowledge in a variety of media for a range of audiences; and
  • Recognize and understand the value of diversity and the significance of interconnectedness in the classroom and beyond.

IAH Course Goals Addressed in this Course

  • Develop a range of intellectual abilities, including critical thinking, logical argument, appropriate uses of evidence and interpretation of varied kinds of information. (quantitative, qualitative, text, image)
  • Become more knowledgeable about other times, places, and cultures as well as key ideas and issues in human experience.
  • Appreciate the role of knowledge, and of values and ethics in understanding human behavior and solving social problems.

Diversity Requirement (D)

This course is designated as a Diversity (D) course and has been approved toward meeting the University Diversity Requirement. Courses designated as “D” emphasize intercultural and diversity issues, ideas, and perspectives unconnected to geography or nation. The “D” designates a connection between intercultural and diversity topics that emphasizes the intersectionality of diverse identities and critical approaches to dominant narratives, institutions, and practices. Overall, courses with “D” focus on themes and questions that transcend time, space, and location. The learning objectives and outcomes of the course will emphasize this designation and provide a guide for how this course furthers understanding of diversity at MSU and beyond.

Specific Course Goals

This lecture class should students introduce to

  • how to think about fundamental aspects of what it means to be human
  • think more clearly about the role of anxiety, death, and rationality
  • the distinction between “having something” and “being someone”
  • Stoicism as a way to tackle anxiety

Note

Real learning is not properly measured by multiple-choice tests; especially since in the humanities there is no specific content of a sort that may be covered well in standardized examinations, which every student in the humanities should be expected to master. Instead, you will – hopefully – come to recognize that this class is about a general intellectual reflection on our contemporary world that requires concepts and critical reflections. The class deals with your dignity as human beings and with your intellect and reason, which is best expressed in a form of learning that is based on understanding and insight, and not mere learning by heart. It is hoped that the class will stimulate the view that intellectual activity (and therefore human reality) has to do with the passion of thinking, and the passion of understanding of our world. Intense confrontation with texts is the center of this class. “Information” as something to be consumed is important but secondary.

Required Texts (Bookstore or Online)

Please buy the following titles:

  • Fromm, To Have or To be? (Bloomsbury Press, ISBN: 9781780936802)
  • Tillich, The Courage to Be (Yale UP, ISBN: 9780300084719)
  • Sartre, Nausea (New Directions, ISBN: 9780811220309)
  • Seneca, Dialogues and Essays (Oxford UP, ISBN: 9780199552405)
  • Epictetus, Discourses and Classics (Oxford UP, ISBN: 9780199595181)

Note: I do not permit the usage of laptops or cell phones in this class. We will read texts together and think about them. There is absolutely no need for Apple or Microsoft. So, please buy paper copies. All books selected for class have reasonable prices.

D2L

  • Additional readings are available via D2L

Course Organization

The course will be organized such that, ideally, each class period will include [i] “interactive” lecture, [ii] discussion time or [iii] response time. Students will be asked to intensively prepare a certain text or part of a text for the next class period.

Course Requirements

  • Daily reading and studying
  • Weekend assignments
  • unannounced assignments in class, including reading quizzes and film reaction assignments
  • Class response sheets

Note

The class and my lectures are solely based on the texts selected for class and require a thorough study and preparation of the material. I will primarily lecture on the readings, which will help you to more fully understand the texts. Therefore it is not sufficient for students to come to class without having prepared the texts. And indeed, in the exams you have to demonstrate whether you have appropriately prepared the readings selected for each lecture.

Note

Every academic misconduct, such as plagiarism, will – without exception – lead to a failing grade in class. Check the Ombudsman’s page (see also note below on plagiarism): https://www.msu.edu/~ombud/

Note on Attendance

I hope and strongly encourage that students attend all lectures. However, I will not require attendance, as I think that college students should manage their own class attendance decisions. I will not call roll. Hence, it is up to you to come to class or not. However, if you do not come to class on a regular basis and participate in class, it is very difficult for you to achieve a good grade in this class, especially since you won’t be able to make up assignments in class. If you choose to attend class, please come on time, turn off cell phones and other electronic devices that interfere with your (and others’) concentration, have the reading prepared and be ready to participate. If you are not prepared, do not bother showing up. It is a sign of disrespect to your peers and the instructor to attend class unprepared. If you miss class, it is your responsibility to obtain class notes from a fellow student and to catch up on reading.

General Note

I expect that you come to class having prepared the texts carefully and thoroughly. The reading for the next session, if not clear from the course schedule (below), will be announced at the end of the previous class. “Preparing for class” implies underlining and making excerpts from the text assigned; looking up unfamiliar vocabulary and writing them into a note book (I encourage you to keep a vocabulary booklet for all of your classes). Just reading the text won’t be sufficient. You have to study the material. Some vocabulary might not be sufficiently explained in a regular dictionary (this goes especially for philosophical terms), so it is necessary to consult additional sources, and the MSU Library Website is a great resource for nearly all questions in this regard).

Unannounced Assignments

There will be announced and unannounced reading quizzes, homework-assignments, and group assignments. Students who do not attend class (and have no written documentation) will lose all points. Reading quizzes, homework assignments, and group assignments cannot be made up without reasonable excuses (see above).

Weekend Response Reading Sheets (Sunday Assignment)

During this semester you should submit weekend reading response sheets, in which you present brief reflections on the readings for the upcoming class session (around 450 words), and formulate up to two precise questions about the material or about something that we discussed in class. These reading response sheets are due on Sundays at noon, via D2L dropbox. This is a generous time frame for you, as I have to read your write-ups late on Sundays. Accordingly, late turn-ins will not be accepted. You will lose all points if you miss the dealine. I will then address brief questions at the beginning of each session. Please download and use this form:

Download Weekend Reading Response Sheet (I will only accept answers that are given on this form)

Class Response Sheets

Every student is asked to submit up to 5 class response sheets during the semester. Please download the form here. Response sheets must be submitted to D2L on the day of class. I will not accept submissions on different days.

Download response sheet (I will only accept answers that are given on this form)

Response Time

Selected response sheets will be addressed at the beginning of each class. This procedure will help you and me to clarify problems, reflect on topics, and to find answers to questions that came up during last class.

Final Assignment

There will be a final take-home essay questions assignment. It is due on the day of the final exam via D2L dropbox.

Make-Up Assignments

Students who need to miss the exam or a film day for excusable reasons (medical+MSU related business) must inform me ahead of time, and will be permitted to make up the exam and film assignment. I will only accept written documentation.

Course Evaluation

Assignments

1 final take-home exam20 points
10 Weekend Reading Responses40 points
Misc. Assignments20 points
5 class response sheets20 points
 ——–
 100 points
  

Grading

4.0 (=A)100 – 93
3.592 – 87
3 (=B)86 – 82
2.581 – 77
2 (=C)76 – 72
1.571 – 65
1.0 (=D)64 – 60
0.0< 60

GENERIC SYLLABUS (might not be applicable to each class)

Laptop/Cell Phone/Tablet Policy

You are not permitted to use laptops or cell phones in class, unless needed for medical reasons. Flat devices, such as tablets, are permitted  if you have purchased the literature required for class electronically. Please do not text under the table. Cell phones should be removed from tables. Failure to follow this policy will lead to unannounced assignments in class or to a lower grade (at the digression of the instructor).

Note on Cell Phones

Your cognitive capacity is significantly reduced when your smartphone is within reach — even if it’s off. That’s the takeaway finding from a new study from the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin. Please also read this: Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation?

Class Attendance

As mentioned above, I do not employ in my classes a class attendance policy. Having said this, you should be aware that class attendance is very important. When engaging in a philosophical and humanistic dialogue it is necessary to be an active and present participant in the ongoing discussion. If you miss class please do not email me asking if you missed anything important. Every class is important. You should get a study buddy for the class; a student in class who will inform you of what you missed. If you miss a class you can come to my office hours or make an appointment to discuss the material, providing you have read the material and you simply want to see if your understanding of the material is on target. Time in office hours will not be used to repeat the class lectures.

Grading Criteria + Paper Writing Tips

Check out this page for grading criteria, example of assignments, etc.

Online Research Sources

Unfortunately, some people think that the internet as such is a reliable source of information. If you decide to use online sources for additional information or your paper then do not just use one of the common internet search engines, such as Google; rather, use reliable academic sources, such as Britannica Online, or the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. The Internet Ecyclopedia of Philosophy isn’t very good, but still acceptable. Check out MSU’s library resources! And, as with other sources, you must cite any online sources to which you refer in your essay.

Writing Center Information

MSU’s writing center offers excellent help on all matters regarding writing and learning. Check the website at http://writing.msu.edu for an overview and hours. For more information, please call 517.432.3610 or send an e-mail to writing@msu.edu.

Grief Absence Policy

I follow MSU’s general grief absence policy, which can be found here.

Integrity of Scholarship and Grades (Plagiarism)

The following statement of University policy addresses principles and procedures to be used in instances of academic dishonesty, violations of professional standards, and falsification of academic or admission records, herein after referred to as academic misconduct. [See General Student Regulation 1.00, Protection of Scholarship and Grades.]

Academic Honesty

Article 2.3.3 of the Academic Freedom Report states that “The student shares with the faculty the responsibility for maintaining the integrity of scholarship, grades, and professional standards.” In addition, the (insert name of unit offering course) adheres to the policies on academic honesty as specified in General Student Regulations 1.0, Protection of Scholarship and Grades; the all-University Policy on Integrity of Scholarship and Grades; and Ordinance 17.00, Examinations. (See Spartan Life: Student Handbook and Resource Guide and/or the MSU Web site: www.msu.edu) Therefore, unless authorized by your instructor, you are expected to complete all course assignments, including homework, lab work, quizzes, tests and exams, without assistance from any source. You are expected to develop original work for this course; therefore, you may not submit course work completed for another course to satisfy the requirements for this course. Students who violate MSU rules may receive a penalty grade, including but not limited to a failing grade on the assignment or in the course. Contact your instructor if you are unsure about the appropriateness of your course work. (See also https://www.msu.edu/~ombud/)

Plagiarism, from the Ombudsman’s page

Plagiarism (from the Latin plagiarius, an abductor, and plagiare, to steal) is defined by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy on Misconduct in Research (take that!) as “ . . . the appropriation of another person’s ideas, processes, results or words without giving appropriate credit.”

Accidental or Unintentional
One may not even know that they are plagiarizing.  It is the student’s responsibility to make certain that they understand the difference between quoting and paraphrasing, as well as the proper way to cite material.

Blatant
Here, students are well aware that they are plagiarizing.  Purposefully using someone else’s ideas or work without proper acknowledgment is plagiarism.  This includes turning in borrowed or bought research papers as one’s own.

Self
Turning in the same term paper (or substantially the same paper) for two courses without getting permission from one’s instructor is plagiarism.

The Spartan Code of Honor

Student leaders have recognized the challenging task of discouraging plagiarism from the
academic community. The Associated Students of Michigan State University (ASMSU) is proud to be launching the Spartan Code of Honor academic pledge, focused on valuing academic integrity and honest work ethics at Michigan State University. The pledge reads as follows:

“As a Spartan, I will strive to uphold values of the highest ethical standard. I will practice honesty in my work, foster honesty in my peers, and take pride in knowing that honor is worth more than grades. I will carry these values beyond my time as a student at Michigan State University, continuing the endeavor to build personal integrity in all that I do.”

The Spartan Code of Honor academic pledge embodies the principles of integrity that every Spartan is required to uphold in their time as a student, and beyond. The academic pledge was crafted with inspiration of existing individual college honor codes, establishing an overarching statement for the entire university. It was formally adopted by ASMSU on March 3, 2016, endorsed by Academic Governance on March 22, 2016, and recognized by the Provost, President, and Board of Trustees on April 15, 2016.

TurnItIn Policy

Consistent with MSU’s efforts to enhance student learning, foster honesty, and maintain integrity in our academic processes, instructors may use a tool in D2L called Turnitin OriginalityCheck to compare a student’s work with multiple sources. The tool compares each student’s work with an extensive database of prior publications and papers, providing links to possible matches and a “similarity score.” The tool does not determine whether plagiarism has occurred or not. Instead, the instructor must make a complete assessment and judge the originality of the student’s work. All submissions to this course may be checked using this tool. Students should submit assignments to be screened by OriginalityCheck without identifying information included in the assignment (e.g., the student’s name, PID, or NetID); the system will automatically show identifying information to the course faculty when viewing the submissions, but this information will not be retained by Turnitin.

SIRS Evaluations

Michigan State University takes seriously the opinion of students in the evaluation of the effectiveness of instruction and has implemented the Student Instructional Rating System (SIRS) to gather student feedback (https://sirsonline.msu.edu). This course utilizes the online SIRS system, and you will receive an e-mail during the last two weeks of class asking you to fill out the SIRS web form at your convenience. In addition, participation in the online SIRS system involves grade sequestration, which means that the final grade for this course will not be accessible on STUINFO during the week following the submission of grades for this course unless the SIRS online form has been completed. Alternatively, you have the option on the SIRS website to decline to participate in the evaluation of the course. We hope, however, that you will be willing to give us your frank and constructive feedback so that we may instruct students even better in the future. If you access the online SIRS website and complete the online SIRS form or decline to participate, you will receive the final grade in this course as usual once final grades are submitted.

Social Media and Sharing of Course Materials

As members of a learning community, students are expected to respect the intellectual property of course instructors. All course materials presented to students are the copyrighted property of the course instructor and are subject to the following conditions of use:

  1. Students may record lectures or any other classroom activities and use the recordings only for their own course-related purposes.
  2. Students may share the recordings with other students enrolled in the class. Sharing is limited to using the recordings only for their own course-related purposes.
  3. Students may post the recordings or other course materials online or distribute them to anyone not enrolled in the class with the advance written permission of the course instructor and, if applicable, any students whose voice or image is included in the recordings.
  4. Any student violating the conditions described above may face academic disciplinary sanctions.

Student Support Program (SSP)

Michigan State University is offering all MSU students access to counseling support 24/7/365 through My SSP: Student Support Program. My SSP is free to all MSU students. My SSP is confidential, and can help with:

  • Adapting to new challenges
  • Being successful at school
  • Relationships with friends and family
  • Practical issues with studying
  • Stress, sadness, loneliness, and more

The My SSP professional counselors are available to help anytime, anywhere with:

  • Immediate support by phone and chat
  • Ongoing support by appointment via phone and video
  • In addition, culturally relevant support is available in the language of the caller’s choice.

There are multiple options for connecting with a My SSP counselor:

  • Download the free My SSP app on Google Play or iTunes
  • Chat online at http://us.myissp.com
  • Call 1-866-743-7732
  • From outside North America, call 001.416.380.657

On & Off Campus 24 Hour Emergency Services:

National Suicide Prevention (Lifeline)
Collect Calls Accepted 24 Hours
1-800- 273-TALK (8255)

MSU Police Department
Emergency: 911
Business Line: (517) 355-2221

MSU Counseling Center Sexual Assault Program
(517) 372-6666

Community Mental Health
(800) 372-8460
(517) 346-8460

MSU Safe Place (Domestic Violence Shelter)
Crisis Line: (517) 355-1100

Accommodations for Students with Disabilities

Students with disabilities should contact the Resource Center for Persons with Disabilities to establish reasonable accommodations. For an appointment with a counselor, call 353-9642 (voice) or 355-1293 (TTY)

Drops and Adds

The last day to add this course is the end of the first week of classes. The last day to drop this course with a 100 percent refund and no grade reported is (see Academic Calendar). The last day to drop this course with no refund and no grade reported is (see Academic Calendar). You should immediately make a copy of your amended schedule to verify you have added or dropped this course.

Note on Attendance

Students who fail to attend the first four class sessions or class by the fifth day of the semester, whichever occurs first, may be dropped from the course.

Spring 2022: Phl 421 – Kierkegaard and Continental Philosophy

Søren Kierkegaard (1813-1855)

General information

Instructor

Here is more information about ProfLotz

Class Meetings

Days: MW
Time: 10:20 AM – 11:40 AM
Place: Natural Sciences Bldg 205

Office

Phone: 517.355.4490 [dept.])
Place: 503 South Kedzie Hall
Hours: before or after class or via appointment

Other Contact

E-mail: lotz@msu.edu
Home Phone: please ask
Webpage: http://christianlotz.info

Box

You will find my box in the front office of the philosophy department (SK 503)

Schedule

Introduction

Jan 10, Introduction
Marcuse, On Concrete Philosophy (D2L, and sent out via email on 1/8)

Jan 12, Introduction: From Hegel to Kierkegaard
Löwith, The Dissolutions of Hegel’s Mediations in the Exclusive Choices of Marx and Kierkegaard (D2L), focus on sections 1 & 2b & 3b

Jan 17, MLK Day
No class

Section I: Subjectivity

Jan 20, Truth is Subjectivity
Kierkegaard, Concluding Unscientific Postscript, ch.2, 189-212

Jan 24, Truth is Subjectivity
Kierkegaard, Concluding Unscientific Postscript, ch.2, 212-251

Jan 26, What it Means to Exist
Kierkegaard, Concluding Unscientific Postscript, ch.3, 301-343

Weekend Assignment 1 due (Jan 30, 4pm)

Jan 31, What it Means to Exist
Kierkegaard, Concluding Unscientific Postscript, ch.3, 343-361

Feb 2, no class (email sent on 2/1)

Feb 7, Becoming Subjective
Kierkegaard, Concluding Unscientific Postscript, ch.1, 127-154

Feb 9, Becoming Subjective
Kierkegaard, Concluding Unscientific Postscript, ch.1, 154-189

Section II: Faith

Weekend Assignment 2 due (Feb 13, 4pm)

Feb 14, Faith
Kierkegaard, Fear and Trembling, 1-54

Feb 16, Faith
Kierkegaard, Fear and Trembling, 1-54

Feb 21, Faith
Kierkegaard, Fear and Trembling, 1-54

Feb 23, Teleological Suspension of the Ethical
Kierkegaard, Fear and Trembling, 54-82

In-Class Group Assignment

Feb 28, Is there an Absolute Duty to God?
Kierkegaard, Fear and Trembling, 82-123

Weekend Assignment 3 due (Feb 27, 4pm)
[CHANGED, new assignment sent out via email]

Mar 2, no class

Mar 7, Break
No class

Mar 9, Break
No class

Midterm Writing Assignment due (Mar 13, 4pm)

Section III: Despair

Mar 14, Despair to (not) Will to be Oneself
Kierkegaard, Sickness Onto Death, 1-29

Mar 16, Despair as Sickness Unto Death
Kierkegaard, Sickness Onto Death, 1-29

Mar 21, Fantastic Self-Relations
Kierkegaard, Sickness Onto Death, 29-42

Mar 23, no class

Weekend Assignment 4 due (Mar 27, 4pm) [on 29-42 OR 42-75]

Mar 28, (Un)Conscious Despair
Kierkegaard, Sickness Onto Death, 42-75

Session V: Reception

Mar 30, Buber reads Kierkegaard
Buber, The Question to the Single One (D2L)

Apr 4, Levinas and Sartre read Kierkegaard
Levinas, Existence and Ethics
Sartre, Kierkegaard: The Single Universal (D2L)

Apr 6, Derrida reads Kierkegaard
Derrida, Whom to Give to (D2L)

Weekend Assignment 5 due (Apr 10, 4pm)

Apr 11, Derrida reads Kierkegaard
Derrida, Whom to Give to (D2L)

Apr 13, Adorno reads Kierkegaard
Adorno, Kierkegaard Once More (D2L)

Apr 18, tbd

Apr 20, Wrap-Up
Last class

Apr 25, No class
No class

Apr 27, No class
No class

Final Paper Due
Monday, May 02, 2022, 10:20 AM via D2L

Course Description

In this 400-level class we will read advanced works in existentialist philosophy by focusing on Kierkegaard’s conceptions of self, anxiety, despair, faith, and individuality in order to reconstruct more advanced existentialist issues. In addition, we will read and discuss essays on Kierkegaard by European philosophers, such as Lukacs, Adorno, Sartre, Buber, Schmitt, Derrida, and Theunissen. Texts to be read and discussed: Sickness unto Death, The Concept of Anxiety, Fear and Trembling, Concluding Unscientific Postscript.

Note: this is an upper-level academic seminar and, as such, a reading intensive course. If you are not willing to get engaged with the texts of one of the most important existentialist philosophers, then do not take this class.

ZOOM/COVID-19 (added: 1/2/22)

  • This class will be taught via ZOOM – hopefully only for three weeks – in a classical fashion. I will talk about the readings and we will have discussions about the issues discussed in the texts.
  • The primary text will be the absolute focus of this class; we will read slowly passages together.
  • Our ZOOM sessions require you to be polite and attentive; as such, I do not want you to turn off your microphone, which, in turn, should make it easier for you to focus on the class session. Please make sure that you are in a quiet spot (at a desk or a table), and that you enter our meetings on time.
  • Please use a headset, which helps us create a more “intimate” atmosphere; headset microphones usually remove background noise; inexpensive headsets can easily be found online. If you can’t afford a headset (or don’t want to use one), then please try to use at least headphones or ear buds.
  • If multiple participants are speaking, and if they also use external speakers to hear the meeting audio, there can be an echo loop. Zoom uses echo cancellation to address this problem. However, headset/headphones/earbuds will eliminate this problem.
  • Please also do not turn off your camera (unless your internet connection is very slow), as this will also help everyone focus on our class session and eliminate distractions.
  • Please do not use your phone for ZOOM sessions.
  • Please do not use your phone for reading the material. This is a philosophy class. It is simply impossible to study philosophical texts via such a small screen. I recommend getting the readings selected for class on paper.
  • Set ZOOM to “gallery view” (instead of “speaker view”), as this makes it easier to see everyone in class (i.e., not only the speaker). Our class is small. So, “gallery view” should work just fine.

Introductory Information

https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/kierkegaard/

Note

This is a 400-level course in philosophy and, as such, contains difficult material and requires mature students. If you are not willing to study dense written material, listen to unusual lectures, and discuss ideas in an organized fashion, then you should not take this class. This class though can be taken by students without prior knowledge in philosophy. You should not take this class if you are not an avid reader.

Course Goals

This class should students introduce to

  • a central Existentialist philosopher, S. Kierkegaard
  • main concepts in Kierkegaards universe, such as faith, anxiety, and despair
  • how to read carefully philosophical texts
  • how to think like an Existentialist!

Note

Students should be aware of the fact that this course is based on difficult texts. Accordingly, this class requires self-responsible learners and an intense confrontation with the primary text. Accordingly, if you are not excited about the prospect of a daily confrontation with abstract and historical reflections, then you should not take this class. This class is not based on a set of fixed knowledge and, as such, is not based on a behavioral idea of education; rather, we will try to learn together and critically examine the material. The instructor of this class does not have anything to teach, but much to learn.

Required Texts

The following titles have been published within the Collected Writings of Kierkegaard by Princeton UP (editors: Hong/Hong). Please do not get different translations/editions.

  • The Concept of Anxiety: A Simple Psychologically Orienting Deliberation on the Dogmatic Issue of Hereditary Sin, Author: Søren Kierkegaard, ISBN: 9780691020112
  • The Sickness Unto Death: A Christian Psychological Exposition for Upbuilding and Awakening Author: Søren Kierkegaard, Edna Hatlestad Hong, Howard Vincent Hong ISBN: 9780691020280
  • Concluding Unscientific Postscript to Philosophical Fragments Author: Søren Kierkegaard ISBN: 9780691020815
  • Kierkegaard’s Writings, VI, Volume 6: Fear and Trembling/Repetition Author: Søren Kierkegaard ISBN: 978140084695

Please get paper editions. I only permit flat devices (tablets) in class. Laptops and phones are NOT permitted for class readings. There is no need for electronic devices in this class. All we do is to read and to think. For that Apple and Microsoft are not necessary. Research has shown that reading comprehension tends to improve when done with paper copies.

Course Requirements

  • daily reading and studying
  • weekend assignments
  • 1 final essay assignment
  • 1 short midterm writing assignment
  • participation

Note

The class and my lectures are solely based on the texts selected for class and require a thorough study and preparation of the material. I will primarily lecture on the readings, which will help you to more fully understand the texts. Therefore it is not sufficient for students to come to class without having prepared the texts. And indeed, in the assignments you have to demonstrate whether you have appropriately prepared the readings selected for each lecture.

Note

Every academic misconduct, such as plagiarism, will – without exception – lead to a failing grade in class. Check the Ombudsman’s page (see also note below on plagiarism):  https://www.msu.edu/~ombud/

Attendance

To get a good grade in this class, regular attendance is required. I will not call roll. Hence, it is up to you to come to class or not. However, if you do not come to class on a regular basis and participate in the class discussion, it is impossible for you to achieve a good grade in this class; so coming to class is your responsibility and your call. If you choose to attend class, please come on time, turn off cell phones and other electronic devices that interfere with your (and others’) concentration, have the reading prepared and be ready to participate. If you are not prepared, do not bother showing up. It is a sign of disrespect to your peers and the instructor to attend class unprepared. If you miss class, it is your responsibility to obtain class notes from a fellow student and to catch up on reading. Nevertheless, please be aware that you should not make me responsible for a failure that results out of your decision. You should be aware that chances to master this class are minimal, if you do not show up for class or if you do not prepare the readings (=studying).

Assignments

Weekend Response Reading Sheets

During this semester you should submit weekend reading response sheets, in which you present brief reflections on the readings for the upcoming class session (600-900 words), and formulate up to three questions. These response sheets are due on Sundays at 4pm, via D2L dropbox. This is a generous time frame for you, as I have to read your write-ups late on Sundays. Accordingly, late turn-ins will not be accepted. You will lose all points if you miss the deadline. I will then address brief questions at the beginning of each session. Please download and use this form:

Weekend Reading Response Sheet (MS Word)

Papers

There will be a mid-term writing assignment (1200 words) and a final paper (1800 words). Graduate Students only need to write a final paper (3000-3600 words).

Unannounced Assignments

There might be – from time to time – spontaneously assigned group assignments in class. Students who do not attend class (and have no medical documentation) will lose all points. Given recent negative experience with student’s unwillingness to read and study primary material, I might assign unannounced reading quizzes. Quizzes cannot be made up (except in cases mentioned below).

Make-Up Assignments

Students who need to miss assignments for excusable reasons, such as a death in their families, MSU related business, emergency weather conditions, or medical reasons, must inform me, and will be permitted to make up assignments.

Course Evaluation

Assignments

Final paper25 points
Participation15 points
5 weekend assignments30 points
Unannounced assignments15 points
midterm assignment15 points
 ——–
  100 points
  

Grading

4.0 (=A)100 – 93
3.592 – 87
3 (=B)86 – 82
2.581 – 77
2 (=C)76 – 72
1.571 – 65
1.0 (=D)64 – 60
0.0< 60

GENERIC SYLLABUS (might not be applicable to each class)

Laptop/Cell Phone/Tablet Policy

You are not permitted to use laptops or cell phones in class, unless needed for medical reasons. Flat devices, such as tablets, are permitted  if you have purchased the literature required for class electronically. Please do not text under the table. Cell phones should be removed from tables. Failure to follow this policy will lead to unannounced assignments in class or loss of points (at the digression of the instructor).

Class Attendance

As mentioned above, I do not employ in my classes a class attendance policy. Having said this, you should be aware that class attendance is very important. When engaging in a philosophical and humanistic dialogue it is necessary to be an active and present participant in the ongoing discussion. If you miss class please do not email me asking if you missed anything important. Every class is important. You should get a study buddy for the class; a student in class who will inform you of what you missed. If you miss a class you can come to my office hours or make an appointment to discuss the material, providing you have read the material and you simply want to see if your understanding of the material is on target. Time in office hours will not be used to repeat the class lectures.

Grading Criteria + Paper Writing Tips

Check out this page for grading criteria, example of assignments, etc.

Online Research Sources

Unfortunately, some people think that the internet as such is a reliable source of information. If you decide to use online sources for additional information or your paper then do not just use one of the common internet search engines, such as Google; rather, use reliable academic sources, such as Britannica Online, or the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. The Internet Ecyclopedia of Philosophy isn’t very good, but still acceptable. Check out MSU’s library resources! And, as with other sources, you must cite any online sources to which you refer in your essay.

Writing Center Information

MSU’s writing center offers excellent help on all matters regarding writing and learning. Check the website at http://writing.msu.edu for an overview and hours. For more information, please call 517.432.3610 or send an e-mail to writing@msu.edu.

Grief Absence Policy

I follow MSU’s general grief absence policy, which can be found here.

Integrity of Scholarship and Grades (Plagiarism)

The following statement of University policy addresses principles and procedures to be used in instances of academic dishonesty, violations of professional standards, and falsification of academic or admission records, herein after referred to as academic misconduct. [See General Student Regulation 1.00, Protection of Scholarship and Grades.]

Academic Honesty

Article 2.3.3 of the Academic Freedom Report states that “The student shares with the faculty the responsibility for maintaining the integrity of scholarship, grades, and professional standards.” In addition, the (insert name of unit offering course) adheres to the policies on academic honesty as specified in General Student Regulations 1.0, Protection of Scholarship and Grades; the all-University Policy on Integrity of Scholarship and Grades; and Ordinance 17.00, Examinations. (See Spartan Life: Student Handbook and Resource Guide and/or the MSU Web site: www.msu.edu) Therefore, unless authorized by your instructor, you are expected to complete all course assignments, including homework, lab work, quizzes, tests and exams, without assistance from any source. You are expected to develop original work for this course; therefore, you may not submit course work completed for another course to satisfy the requirements for this course. Students who violate MSU rules may receive a penalty grade, including but not limited to a failing grade on the assignment or in the course. Contact your instructor if you are unsure about the appropriateness of your course work. (See also https://www.msu.edu/~ombud/)

Plagiarism, from the Ombudsman’s page

Plagiarism (from the Latin plagiarius, an abductor, and plagiare, to steal) is defined by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy on Misconduct in Research (take that!) as “ . . . the appropriation of another person’s ideas, processes, results or words without giving appropriate credit.”

Accidental or Unintentional
One may not even know that they are plagiarizing.  It is the student’s responsibility to make certain that they understand the difference between quoting and paraphrasing, as well as the proper way to cite material.

Blatant
Here, students are well aware that they are plagiarizing.  Purposefully using someone else’s ideas or work without proper acknowledgment is plagiarism.  This includes turning in borrowed or bought research papers as one’s own.

Self
Turning in the same term paper (or substantially the same paper) for two courses without getting permission from one’s instructor is plagiarism.

The Spartan Code of Honor

Student leaders have recognized the challenging task of discouraging plagiarism from the academic community. The Associated Students of Michigan State University (ASMSU) is proud to be launching the Spartan Code of Honor academic pledge, focused on valuing academic integrity and honest work ethics at Michigan State University. The pledge reads as follows:

“As a Spartan, I will strive to uphold values of the highest ethical standard. I will practice honesty in my work, foster honesty in my peers, and take pride in knowing that honor is worth more than grades. I will carry these values beyond my time as a student at Michigan State University, continuing the endeavor to build personal integrity in all that I do.”

The Spartan Code of Honor academic pledge embodies the principles of integrity that every Spartan is required to uphold in their time as a student, and beyond. The academic pledge was crafted with inspiration of existing individual college honor codes, establishing an overarching statement for the entire university. It was formally adopted by ASMSU on March 3, 2016, endorsed by Academic Governance on March 22, 2016, and recognized by the Provost, President, and Board of Trustees on April 15, 2016.

SIRS Evaluations

Michigan State University takes seriously the opinion of students in the evaluation of the effectiveness of instruction and has implemented the Student Instructional Rating System (SIRS) to gather student feedback (https://sirsonline.msu.edu). This course utilizes the online SIRS system, and you will receive an e-mail during the last two weeks of class asking you to fill out the SIRS web form at your convenience. In addition, participation in the online SIRS system involves grade sequestration, which means that the final grade for this course will not be accessible on STUINFO during the week following the submission of grades for this course unless the SIRS online form has been completed. Alternatively, you have the option on the SIRS website to decline to participate in the evaluation of the course. We hope, however, that you will be willing to give us your frank and constructive feedback so that we may instruct students even better in the future. If you access the online SIRS website and complete the online SIRS form or decline to participate, you will receive the final grade in this course as usual once final grades are submitted.

Social Media and Sharing of Course Materials

As members of a learning community, students are expected to respect the intellectual property of course instructors. All course materials presented to students are the copyrighted property of the course instructor and are subject to the following conditions of use:

  1. Students may record lectures or any other classroom activities and use the recordings only for their own course-related purposes.
  2. Students may share the recordings with other students enrolled in the class. Sharing is limited to using the recordings only for their own course-related purposes.
  3. Students may post the recordings or other course materials online or distribute them to anyone not enrolled in the class with the advance written permission of the course instructor and, if applicable, any students whose voice or image is included in the recordings.
  4. Any student violating the conditions described above may face academic disciplinary sanctions.

Student Support Program (SSP)

Michigan State University is offering all MSU students access to counseling support 24/7/365 through My SSP: Student Support Program. My SSP is free to all MSU students. My SSP is confidential, and can help with:

  • Adapting to new challenges
  • Being successful at school
  • Relationships with friends and family
  • Practical issues with studying
  • Stress, sadness, loneliness, and more

The My SSP professional counselors are available to help anytime, anywhere with:

  • Immediate support by phone and chat
  • Ongoing support by appointment via phone and video
  • In addition, culturally relevant support is available in the language of the caller’s choice.

There are multiple options for connecting with a My SSP counselor:

  • Download the free My SSP app on Google Play or iTunes
  • Chat online at http://us.myissp.com
  • Call 1-866-743-7732
  • From outside North America, call 001.416.380.657

Accommodations for Students with Disabilities

Students with disabilities should contact the Resource Center for Persons with Disabilities to establish reasonable accommodations. For an appointment with a counselor, call 353-9642 (voice) or 355-1293 (TTY)

Drops and Adds

The last day to add this course is the end of the first week of classes. The last day to drop this course with a 100 percent refund and no grade reported is (see Academic Calendar). The last day to drop this course with no refund and no grade reported is (see Academic Calendar). You should immediately make a copy of your amended schedule to verify you have added or dropped this course.

Note on Attendance

Students who fail to attend the first four class sessions or class by the fifth day of the semester, whichever occurs first, may be dropped from the course.